Top 6 Magnesium Rich Foods for Your Diet

Top 6 Magnesium Rich Foods for Your Diet

Did you know that every cell in your body is made up of magnesium and needs it to function? 

Magnesium is the fourth most abounding mineral in the human body and is a cofactor for over 300 biochemical reactions including metabolism. It plays a vital role in maintaining health and life.

 

Health Benefits of Magnesium
Several studies show that magnesium plays a vital role in the health of your body. A study published in the Pharmacological Reports (2013) found that different types of depression and psychiatric symptoms were observed in magnesium deficiency. Magnesium was found to support brain function.

 

Another study published in the Nutrients Journal (2015) found that low levels of magnesium was linked with a number of chronic diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, insulin resistance, high blood pressure, type-2 diabetes, stroke, migraine headaches and many more.

Another study also published in the Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care Journal (2014) found that magnesium deficiency was linked to chronic inflammation which is the root cause of many chronic diseases.

It is important for you to reach the recommended daily intake of magnesium. Including magnesium rich foods in your diet can help you attain the daily requirement.

 

Here Are 6 Top Magnesium Rich Foods for Your Diet….

 

1) Avocado
Avocado is an extremely nutritious magnesium rich food. A medium avocado provides about 15% of the daily required amount of magnesium. Avocado is also high in healthy monounsaturated fat, antioxidants, dietary fibre, potassium and the B vitamins.

Avocado has amazing health benefits. A study published in the Nutrition Journal (2013) found that the addition of half an avocado to a lunch meal increased fullness and decreased the desire to eat.

Another study published in the Food & Function (2013) found that adding avocado to your diet can help reduce inflammation.

 

2) Dark Chocolate
Dark chocolate is a very healthy and delicious magnesium rich food. About three squares of dark chocolate contains 16% of the daily required amount of magnesium. Dark chocolate is also rich in polyphenols, manganese, copper and iron.

Dark chocolate has been found to have various health benefits. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2011) found that cocoa-derived flavanols in dark chocolate contains prebiotic fibre that reach the large intestine and feed the good bacteria in your gut.

Another study also published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2001) found that a diet high in cocoa powder and dark chocolate reduces LDL damage and protects the lining of the cells in your arteries.

It is vital to choose dark chocolate that contains at least 70% cocoa solids or higher.

 

3) Green Leafy Vegetables
Green leafy vegetables are very healthy magnesium rich foods. A 1 cup serving of a cooked green vegetable like spinach contains about 39% of the daily required amount of magnesium.

Green leafy vegetables are also rich in other vitamins and minerals including vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin A and iron. Green vegetables have been shown to have health benefits. A study published in the Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics Journal (2015) has shown that the regular consumption of vegetables is strongly linked to a reduced risk of developing chronic diseases such as cancer.

Green leafy vegetables with large amounts of magnesium include kale, spinach, collard greens and many more.

4) Nuts
Nuts are very tasty magnesium rich foods. Cashew nuts, brazil nuts and almonds are nuts that are high in magnesium. 28g of cashew nuts contains about 20% of the daily required amount of magnesium.

Nuts are also rich in vitamins, other minerals, dietary fibre and healthy monounsaturated fat.

Nuts have been found to have health benefits. A study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2013) found that the effect of consuming nuts with meals or as a snack reduced your appetite and did not increase the risk for weight gain.

Another study published in the Nutrition Journal (2014) found that the regular consumption of nuts improves inflammatory markers and helps to reduce inflammation.

It is important to soak your nuts in warm water and sea salt overnight and dry it in the oven on low heat before consuming, this will help to break down a large amount of the phytic acid and other enzyme inhibitors and make the nutrients in the nuts more available for your body to absorb.

 

5) Fatty fish
Fatty fish are very nutritious magnesium rich foods. Half a fillet of fatty fish like salmon contains about 13% of the daily required amount of magnesium.

Fatty fish are also rich in omega-3 fatty acids, protein, selenium, B vitamins and other nutrients. Consuming fatty fish has been shown to have health benefits. A study published in the Public Health Nutrition Journal (2012) found that the regular consumption of fish including fatty fish decreased risk of heart disease.

Fatty fish rich in magnesium include salmon, sardines, mackerel and halibut.

 

6) Seeds
Seeds are very healthy magnesium rich foods. Seeds are also rich in antioxidants, dietary fibre, omega-3 fatty acids, iron and healthy monounsaturated fats.

Seeds have been shown to have various health benefits. A study published in the Journal of Nutrition (2015) found that milled flaxseed lowers total and LDL cholesterol.

Seeds rich in magnesium include flax, chia and pumpkin seeds. A 28g serving of pumpkin seeds contains about 37% of the daily required amount of magnesium.

 

The Bottom Line

Magnesium is a key mineral that is essential for improving your health and reducing your risk of illness. It is important to include magnesium rich foods in your diet to help you attain the daily required amount.

References:
Serefko A, Szopa A, Wlaz P, Nowak G, Radziwori-Zaleska M, Skalski M, Poleszak E (2013) Magnesium in depression. Pharmacological Reports, 65: 547-554.

Grober U, Schmidt J, Kisters k (2015) Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy. Nutrients, 7: 8199-8226.

Wien M, Haddad E, Oda K, Sabate J (2013) A randomized 3×3 crossover study to evaluate the effect of Hass avocado intake on post-ingestive satiety, glucose and insulin levels, and subsequent energy intake in overweight adults. Nutrition Journal, 12:155.

Li Z, Wong A, Henning S M, Zhang Y, Jones A, Zerlin A, Thames G, Bowerman S, Tseng C H, Heber D (2013) Hass avocado modulates postprandial vascular reactivity and postprandial inflammatory responses to a hamburger meal in healthy volunteers

Tzounis X, Rodrigues-Mateos A, Vulevic J, Gibson G R, Kwik-Uribe C, Spencer J P (2011) Prebiotic evaluation of cocoa-derived flavanols in healthy humans by using a randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover intervention study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 93: 62-72.

Wan Y, Vinson J A, Etherton T D, Proch J, Lazarus S A, Kris-Etherton P M (20010 Effects of cocoa powder and dark chocolate on LDL oxidative susceptibility and prostaglandin concentrations in humans. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,74: 596-602.

Tan S Y, Mattes R D (2013) Appetitive, dietary and health effects of almonds consumed with meals or as snacks: a randomised, controlled trial. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 67: 1205 – 1214.

Colpo E, Dalton D A Vilanova C, Reetz L G, Duarte M M, Farias I L, Meinerz D F, Mariano D O, Vendrusculo R G, Boligon A A, Dalla Corte CL, Wagner R, Athayde M L, da Rocha J B (2014) Brazilian nut consumption by healthy volunteers improves inflammatory parameters. Nutrition, 30: 459-465.

Zheng J, Huang T, Yu Y, Hu X, Yang B, Li D (2012) Fish consumption and CHD mortality: an updated meta-analysis of seventeen cohort studies. Public Health Nutrition Journal,15: 725-737. leyva D, Maddaford T G, Caligiuri S P, Austria J A, Weighell W.

Edel A L, Rodriguez-Leyva D, Maddaford T G, Caligiuri S P, Austria J A, Weighell W, Guzman R, Aliani M, Pierce G N (2015) Dietary flaxseed independently lowers circulating cholesterol and lowers it beyond the effects of cholesterol-lowering medications alone in patients with peripheral artery disease. Journal of Nutrition, 145: 749-757.

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